Maker

Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.Make! Play! Learn!
Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.

Make! Play! Learn!

Our spring Maker Sharing, Make Play Learn, took place on May 16, 2013 at the DreamYard Art Center. Each student had a chance to show off what they learned by teaching guests at 5 different stations: how to solder, how to make glitch images, how to make their own LED card, or about our Maker Bunch Installation that allowed guests to play short videos about the participants in our class by touching different boxes connected to a microcontroller.


NYU-Poly Paper Prototype: Part 2
The DreamYard Maker program teamed up with Museum of the Moving Image and NYU-Poly for a special project called From the Lab to the Living Room. This project was funded by the Hive Digital Media Learning Fund in The New York Community Trust.

For this project our participants took a field trip to the CITE Game Innovation Lab at NYU-Poly to learn about applications for new technologies such as Sifteo cubes and skeleton recognition using the Kinect. Then our Makers participated in a follow-up workshop to make paper prototypes of their own applications for these technologies. This is the video from our second follow up workshop explaining the participants’ paper prototype.


NYU-Poly Paper Prototypes: Part 2
Another Friday Workshop with NYU-Poly! Each group was asked to pick a goal:  design a digital game based on a non-digital game or design a digital game that will make people play cooperatively. Each group came up with 5 brainstorm ideas for their game using the technologies given. From there, everyone chose their best idea to develop a paper prototype, test their game, and show it off!NYU-Poly Paper Prototypes: Part 2
Another Friday Workshop with NYU-Poly! Each group was asked to pick a goal:  design a digital game based on a non-digital game or design a digital game that will make people play cooperatively. Each group came up with 5 brainstorm ideas for their game using the technologies given. From there, everyone chose their best idea to develop a paper prototype, test their game, and show it off!NYU-Poly Paper Prototypes: Part 2
Another Friday Workshop with NYU-Poly! Each group was asked to pick a goal:  design a digital game based on a non-digital game or design a digital game that will make people play cooperatively. Each group came up with 5 brainstorm ideas for their game using the technologies given. From there, everyone chose their best idea to develop a paper prototype, test their game, and show it off!NYU-Poly Paper Prototypes: Part 2
Another Friday Workshop with NYU-Poly! Each group was asked to pick a goal:  design a digital game based on a non-digital game or design a digital game that will make people play cooperatively. Each group came up with 5 brainstorm ideas for their game using the technologies given. From there, everyone chose their best idea to develop a paper prototype, test their game, and show it off!NYU-Poly Paper Prototypes: Part 2
Another Friday Workshop with NYU-Poly! Each group was asked to pick a goal:  design a digital game based on a non-digital game or design a digital game that will make people play cooperatively. Each group came up with 5 brainstorm ideas for their game using the technologies given. From there, everyone chose their best idea to develop a paper prototype, test their game, and show it off!

NYU-Poly Paper Prototypes: Part 2

Another Friday Workshop with NYU-Poly! Each group was asked to pick a goal:  design a digital game based on a non-digital game or design a digital game that will make people play cooperatively. Each group came up with 5 brainstorm ideas for their game using the technologies given. From there, everyone chose their best idea to develop a paper prototype, test their game, and show it off!


NYU-Poly Field Trip 2
Time for another field trip to NYU-Poly! This time our DY Makers were able to meet two new game designers,  Kaho Abe and Phoenix Perry. Phoenix showed us her PlayStation Vida version of the table game Set and Kaho showed us how she used the Kinect to get people to play together with her Ninja Shadow game. We also learned that it takes a lot of time and practice to get a game to work, they aren’t many girls in the field of game design so we should be nicer to them, and that EVERYBODY fails.NYU-Poly Field Trip 2
Time for another field trip to NYU-Poly! This time our DY Makers were able to meet two new game designers,  Kaho Abe and Phoenix Perry. Phoenix showed us her PlayStation Vida version of the table game Set and Kaho showed us how she used the Kinect to get people to play together with her Ninja Shadow game. We also learned that it takes a lot of time and practice to get a game to work, they aren’t many girls in the field of game design so we should be nicer to them, and that EVERYBODY fails.NYU-Poly Field Trip 2
Time for another field trip to NYU-Poly! This time our DY Makers were able to meet two new game designers,  Kaho Abe and Phoenix Perry. Phoenix showed us her PlayStation Vida version of the table game Set and Kaho showed us how she used the Kinect to get people to play together with her Ninja Shadow game. We also learned that it takes a lot of time and practice to get a game to work, they aren’t many girls in the field of game design so we should be nicer to them, and that EVERYBODY fails.NYU-Poly Field Trip 2
Time for another field trip to NYU-Poly! This time our DY Makers were able to meet two new game designers,  Kaho Abe and Phoenix Perry. Phoenix showed us her PlayStation Vida version of the table game Set and Kaho showed us how she used the Kinect to get people to play together with her Ninja Shadow game. We also learned that it takes a lot of time and practice to get a game to work, they aren’t many girls in the field of game design so we should be nicer to them, and that EVERYBODY fails.

NYU-Poly Field Trip 2

Time for another field trip to NYU-Poly! This time our DY Makers were able to meet two new game designers, Kaho Abe and Phoenix Perry.
Phoenix showed us her PlayStation Vida version of the table game Set and Kaho showed us how she used the Kinect to get people to play together with her Ninja Shadow game. We also learned that it takes a lot of time and practice to get a game to work, they aren’t many girls in the field of game design so we should be nicer to them, and that EVERYBODY fails.


Glitched Images
Today in maker we took the first half of the class to talk about our building projects. We took turns talking about what worked, what didn’t, what we liked about the project, the hardest part of the project, and what we would fix if we had a chance to go back and fix the project. The second half of the day was dedicated to the “Glitch Art” Community where artists make mistakes on purpose to create their work. Then we made our own glitch art by opening up images in a text editing program, deleting chunks of random code, then saving it (to permanently distort the original image) until we liked our final image.Glitched Images
Today in maker we took the first half of the class to talk about our building projects. We took turns talking about what worked, what didn’t, what we liked about the project, the hardest part of the project, and what we would fix if we had a chance to go back and fix the project. The second half of the day was dedicated to the “Glitch Art” Community where artists make mistakes on purpose to create their work. Then we made our own glitch art by opening up images in a text editing program, deleting chunks of random code, then saving it (to permanently distort the original image) until we liked our final image.Glitched Images
Today in maker we took the first half of the class to talk about our building projects. We took turns talking about what worked, what didn’t, what we liked about the project, the hardest part of the project, and what we would fix if we had a chance to go back and fix the project. The second half of the day was dedicated to the “Glitch Art” Community where artists make mistakes on purpose to create their work. Then we made our own glitch art by opening up images in a text editing program, deleting chunks of random code, then saving it (to permanently distort the original image) until we liked our final image.Glitched Images
Today in maker we took the first half of the class to talk about our building projects. We took turns talking about what worked, what didn’t, what we liked about the project, the hardest part of the project, and what we would fix if we had a chance to go back and fix the project. The second half of the day was dedicated to the “Glitch Art” Community where artists make mistakes on purpose to create their work. Then we made our own glitch art by opening up images in a text editing program, deleting chunks of random code, then saving it (to permanently distort the original image) until we liked our final image.Glitched Images
Today in maker we took the first half of the class to talk about our building projects. We took turns talking about what worked, what didn’t, what we liked about the project, the hardest part of the project, and what we would fix if we had a chance to go back and fix the project. The second half of the day was dedicated to the “Glitch Art” Community where artists make mistakes on purpose to create their work. Then we made our own glitch art by opening up images in a text editing program, deleting chunks of random code, then saving it (to permanently distort the original image) until we liked our final image.Glitched Images
Today in maker we took the first half of the class to talk about our building projects. We took turns talking about what worked, what didn’t, what we liked about the project, the hardest part of the project, and what we would fix if we had a chance to go back and fix the project. The second half of the day was dedicated to the “Glitch Art” Community where artists make mistakes on purpose to create their work. Then we made our own glitch art by opening up images in a text editing program, deleting chunks of random code, then saving it (to permanently distort the original image) until we liked our final image.Glitched Images
Today in maker we took the first half of the class to talk about our building projects. We took turns talking about what worked, what didn’t, what we liked about the project, the hardest part of the project, and what we would fix if we had a chance to go back and fix the project. The second half of the day was dedicated to the “Glitch Art” Community where artists make mistakes on purpose to create their work. Then we made our own glitch art by opening up images in a text editing program, deleting chunks of random code, then saving it (to permanently distort the original image) until we liked our final image.

Glitched Images

Today in maker we took the first half of the class to talk about our building projects. We took turns talking about what worked, what didn’t, what we liked about the project, the hardest part of the project, and what we would fix if we had a chance to go back and fix the project. The second half of the day was dedicated to the “Glitch Art” Community where artists make mistakes on purpose to create their work. Then we made our own glitch art by opening up images in a text editing program, deleting chunks of random code, then saving it (to permanently distort the original image) until we liked our final image.


Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.Potentiometer Building Day 2
This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.

Potentiometer Building Day 2


This week we painted our mini buildings, finished our circuits, and put everything together. We started the day with a crash course in watercolor painting including a refresher on color combinations. We moved on to soldering the final four connections in our circuits and then added a battery to see if the circuit works. Once we got everyone’s circuits working, we taped them to the inside of the houses and let our little maker city glow.


My Holiday Card
This week, the DY Makers learned how to make a very basic circuit using copper tape, a small battery, and LEDs. Each student began the lesson by answering a worksheet with the following prompts to help them create their own holiday:
What are three of your favorite things? (Things that would make you the saddest panda in the world if they didn’t exist.
Which one of these things do you think you could celebrate for a full day (or more)? Could you combine some things together?
Who would celebrate it with you? 
When would you celebrate it? Season? Month? Day?
What is the story behind your holiday? It needs to be at least 3 sentences long and have all of the elements of storytelling: Character, Object, Journey, Obstacle. (It’s ok to make it up. Most folk tales are completely ridiculous. Think about the Easter Bunny story and laugh.)
What is the name of your holiday? Write it big!What is your holiday symbol? Draw it and be cool! (Closed shapes are your friends, I promise.)
They then used these answers to make their own holiday card with at least 2 LEDs integrated into their design and a simple circuit on the inside that would make them glow.My Holiday Card
This week, the DY Makers learned how to make a very basic circuit using copper tape, a small battery, and LEDs. Each student began the lesson by answering a worksheet with the following prompts to help them create their own holiday:
What are three of your favorite things? (Things that would make you the saddest panda in the world if they didn’t exist.
Which one of these things do you think you could celebrate for a full day (or more)? Could you combine some things together?
Who would celebrate it with you? 
When would you celebrate it? Season? Month? Day?
What is the story behind your holiday? It needs to be at least 3 sentences long and have all of the elements of storytelling: Character, Object, Journey, Obstacle. (It’s ok to make it up. Most folk tales are completely ridiculous. Think about the Easter Bunny story and laugh.)
What is the name of your holiday? Write it big!What is your holiday symbol? Draw it and be cool! (Closed shapes are your friends, I promise.)
They then used these answers to make their own holiday card with at least 2 LEDs integrated into their design and a simple circuit on the inside that would make them glow.My Holiday Card
This week, the DY Makers learned how to make a very basic circuit using copper tape, a small battery, and LEDs. Each student began the lesson by answering a worksheet with the following prompts to help them create their own holiday:
What are three of your favorite things? (Things that would make you the saddest panda in the world if they didn’t exist.
Which one of these things do you think you could celebrate for a full day (or more)? Could you combine some things together?
Who would celebrate it with you? 
When would you celebrate it? Season? Month? Day?
What is the story behind your holiday? It needs to be at least 3 sentences long and have all of the elements of storytelling: Character, Object, Journey, Obstacle. (It’s ok to make it up. Most folk tales are completely ridiculous. Think about the Easter Bunny story and laugh.)
What is the name of your holiday? Write it big!What is your holiday symbol? Draw it and be cool! (Closed shapes are your friends, I promise.)
They then used these answers to make their own holiday card with at least 2 LEDs integrated into their design and a simple circuit on the inside that would make them glow.My Holiday Card
This week, the DY Makers learned how to make a very basic circuit using copper tape, a small battery, and LEDs. Each student began the lesson by answering a worksheet with the following prompts to help them create their own holiday:
What are three of your favorite things? (Things that would make you the saddest panda in the world if they didn’t exist.
Which one of these things do you think you could celebrate for a full day (or more)? Could you combine some things together?
Who would celebrate it with you? 
When would you celebrate it? Season? Month? Day?
What is the story behind your holiday? It needs to be at least 3 sentences long and have all of the elements of storytelling: Character, Object, Journey, Obstacle. (It’s ok to make it up. Most folk tales are completely ridiculous. Think about the Easter Bunny story and laugh.)
What is the name of your holiday? Write it big!What is your holiday symbol? Draw it and be cool! (Closed shapes are your friends, I promise.)
They then used these answers to make their own holiday card with at least 2 LEDs integrated into their design and a simple circuit on the inside that would make them glow.My Holiday Card
This week, the DY Makers learned how to make a very basic circuit using copper tape, a small battery, and LEDs. Each student began the lesson by answering a worksheet with the following prompts to help them create their own holiday:
What are three of your favorite things? (Things that would make you the saddest panda in the world if they didn’t exist.
Which one of these things do you think you could celebrate for a full day (or more)? Could you combine some things together?
Who would celebrate it with you? 
When would you celebrate it? Season? Month? Day?
What is the story behind your holiday? It needs to be at least 3 sentences long and have all of the elements of storytelling: Character, Object, Journey, Obstacle. (It’s ok to make it up. Most folk tales are completely ridiculous. Think about the Easter Bunny story and laugh.)
What is the name of your holiday? Write it big!What is your holiday symbol? Draw it and be cool! (Closed shapes are your friends, I promise.)
They then used these answers to make their own holiday card with at least 2 LEDs integrated into their design and a simple circuit on the inside that would make them glow.My Holiday Card
This week, the DY Makers learned how to make a very basic circuit using copper tape, a small battery, and LEDs. Each student began the lesson by answering a worksheet with the following prompts to help them create their own holiday:
What are three of your favorite things? (Things that would make you the saddest panda in the world if they didn’t exist.
Which one of these things do you think you could celebrate for a full day (or more)? Could you combine some things together?
Who would celebrate it with you? 
When would you celebrate it? Season? Month? Day?
What is the story behind your holiday? It needs to be at least 3 sentences long and have all of the elements of storytelling: Character, Object, Journey, Obstacle. (It’s ok to make it up. Most folk tales are completely ridiculous. Think about the Easter Bunny story and laugh.)
What is the name of your holiday? Write it big!What is your holiday symbol? Draw it and be cool! (Closed shapes are your friends, I promise.)
They then used these answers to make their own holiday card with at least 2 LEDs integrated into their design and a simple circuit on the inside that would make them glow.

My Holiday Card

This week, the DY Makers learned how to make a very basic circuit using copper tape, a small battery, and LEDs. Each student began the lesson by answering a worksheet with the following prompts to help them create their own holiday:

  • What are three of your favorite things? (Things that would make you the saddest panda in the world if they didn’t exist.
  • Which one of these things do you think you could celebrate for a full day (or more)? Could you combine some things together?
  • Who would celebrate it with you?
  • When would you celebrate it? Season? Month? Day?
  • What is the story behind your holiday? It needs to be at least 3 sentences long and have all of the elements of storytelling: Character, Object, Journey, Obstacle. (It’s ok to make it up. Most folk tales are completely ridiculous. Think about the Easter Bunny story and laugh.)
  • What is the name of your holiday? Write it big!What is your holiday symbol? Draw it and be cool! (Closed shapes are your friends, I promise.)


They then used these answers to make their own holiday card with at least 2 LEDs integrated into their design and a simple circuit on the inside that would make them glow.